Journal reviews / book chapters about J.G.s work

2015

Power, Liza “Walking to the end of the World”, The Age, Monday 7 Sept. 2015, Spectrum, p.22

2015.09.07-Walking-to-the-end-of-the-world-The-Age-digital

http://www.theage.com.au/entertainment/mildura-palimpsest-2015-drives-artists-to-the-end-of-the-world-20150829-gj908x.html

2014

Downes, Briony, 2014, ‘Julie Gough: Travelling through History’, ARTGUIDE, July/Aug,

http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/julie-gough-travelling-through-history/

As an artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist, Julie Gough’s career has been dedicated to unearthing Tasmania’s Aboriginal history and her own place within it.

Being clipped on the head by an eagle is an impressive way to birth a career in art. This is exactly what happened to Julie Gough when she was riding pillion on a motorbike down a remote highway 20 years ago. The eagle hit and Gough reconsidered her options. A creative life of self- discovery emerged on top of the list.

Throughout her artistic career, this renowned Tasmanian artist has journeyed a personal and creative path exploring historical stories and their connection to memory, place and our perception of the past. Her maternal Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage is a strong influence on her work and the desire to unearth the stories of her people runs deep.

“My major motivation to make art is aligned to my ongoing curiosity and concern about Australian history, particularly the colonial period and cross-cultural contact and interactions in the 19th century,” Gough explains. “I am trying to unravel what happened here and reconstruct what was often not well recorded or was even purposely erased or silenced by the colonising majority in terms of Aboriginal history.”

Encompassing sculpture, installation, sound and video, Gough’s practice is interwoven with tradition and history, allowing her work to travel across time to unify the past with the present in a reimagining of unresolved narratives. “Some stories permeate beyond the written or spoken word to plague me,” the artist says. “They tend to present – almost uncannily – the means, materials and techniques by which I can represent those stories in the form of art.” Using found objects such as cuttlefish bone, tea tree and shell, Gough is able to link works such as Locus, 2008, and Fugitive History: Killymoon, Spearloar, Head Count, 2008, back to the encounters of her ancestors, connecting to the native environment and the traces of those who once lived there.

Most recently, Gough’s ability to reimagine the past has led to her inclusion in the second season of Aboriginal art series Art + Soul. Presenter and respected curator Hetti Perkins says she chose Gough for her ability to “accumulate and process information (and misinformation) and chart a course through it”. Having collected Gough’s work for the Art Gallery of New South Wales during her time as senior curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, Perkins goes on to say, “Julie has always created work with conceptual rigour. She is a natural-born artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist. She makes her work with such conviction and that is what makes her and her art so compelling. Her works have integrity and they are sublimely beautiful.”

Looking over the breadth of Gough’s work, it is clear her career has been a considered process that has evolved through meticulous research and intensive creative study. “About 80 per cent of my available art time is dedicated to researching in the archives and on the ground, outdoors, mostly in Tasmania,” she says. Through this methodical progression of research and making, Gough has developed a unique visual language, conceptually rich with signs and symbols designed to trigger memory and emotion.

In Medical Series, 1994, a collection of metal cases displayed objects such as human hair and plaster teeth, evoking an uncomfortable familiarity and recalling outdated scientific experiments used to determine identity and physical attributes as a way to suggest racial inferiority. “I think art reaches an audience differently than history books and film documentaries,” states Gough. “Artworks bypass a viewer’s regular channels of sought input. They are sensed and felt, they gain a foothold before the ‘rational’ brain directs a viewer to their own precon- ceived beliefs on how to read and respond to the world. This is history re-visioned by stealth via art.”

Gough is a traveller in every sense. Her first big break was having her work selected by Judy Annear for Perspecta in 1994 and, since then, Gough has moved through a series of residencies, scholarships and academic posts, making her way across the globe via destinations including Mauritius, New York, Paris, Liverpool and Ireland. This physical experience of travel fits well with her work and the concept of place is an integral part of Gough’s art practice.

“The point about place for me is by being at various places, I am actively reconnecting with them or learning afresh about places beyond my ancestry and cultural connections, pressing my own ability to face, recognise and move beyond the limitations of having grown up in suburbia,” she explains. “Where possible, I am mostly attempting to see and experience place in the manner of my ancestors. Sometimes it feels close and that is exhilarating.”

In Traveller, 2013, a video depicting Gough attempting to hitchhike her way across Tasmania to culturally significant locations such as the Nut (a giant volcanic plug jutting into the sea on the north-west coast), the viewer watches as she moves through the colonised landscape, screwing together her spears and awkwardly hunting a horse along the way. Often relying on video to document these journeys, Gough uses location and memory to record the precarious links between past and present. She describes this expressive and ritualistic process as “a reteaching of self, as an adult with anxieties, self-imposed constraints and misreadings to work through and excise”.

While most of Gough’s work is centred on colonial and Aboriginal history, her interest in the significance of place and memory has also extended to locales further afield. During a trip to Liverpool, Gough researched the history of Bluecoat Hospital’s school and orphanage, consequently creating HOME sweet HOME, 1999. Struck by the cold, unemotional rendering of gravestones listing the names of 122 children who died in institutions such as Bluecoat, Gough painstakingly took graphite rubbings and transferred the names onto six white mattresses. Forming each name from thousands of tiny pinheads (since many of the children were exploited for labour as pin-makers), HOME sweet HOME became a poignant act of recognition and remembrance. Similar to the fastidious construction of works reflecting her own history, Gough repeatedly uses materials significant to a place to reimagine the past and bring it back into the light.

For Gough, one of the most personally affecting works to create has been Observance, 2012. Over three camping trips to her traditional country of Tebrikunna (the north-east coast of Tasmania), Gough filmed her experience of living within the landscape, alone yet constantly interrupted by eco tourists. “I learnt a lot about life, seasons, plants and animals at that place,” she recalls. “The resonances of the past became clearer and louder with each extended stay.” Further describing the work in an artist statement, Gough goes on to say, “Observance is about trespass. It is a meditation about history, memory and ancestry set amidst the ongoing globalisation of my ancestral coastlands by anonymous groups of uninvited walkers, the descendants of the colonisers.”

Currently working towards solo shows at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in Melbourne later this year and at Hobart’s Bett Gallery for mid-2015, Gough continues to poignantly inform our perception of the past and reveal how it remains a persistent under- current of contemporary experience. Reflecting on her career Gough observes, “Each work leads to the next and they are all part of a continuum. My work is a kind of pulse, demonstrating I am still alive and responding by making art.” It is a steady pulse that beats strong and clear.

The second series of Art + Soul begins on ABC1 on Tuesday 8 July, 8.30pm, as part of NAIDOC week; it continues over three episodes until Tuesday 22 July.

Julie Gough is exhibiting at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, from 23 October to 16 November and at Bett Gallery, Hobart, in July 2015.

See more at: http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/julie-gough-travelling-through-history/#sthash.F31mcxJc.dpuf

Julie Gough: Travelling Through History

by Briony Downes  |  Posted 08 Jul 2014

 As an artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist, Julie Gough’s career has been dedicated to unearthing Tasmania’s Aboriginal history and her own place within it. 

Being clipped on the head by an eagle is an impressive way to birth a career in art. This is exactly what happened to Julie Gough when she was riding pillion on a motorbike down a remote highway 20 years ago. The eagle hit and Gough reconsidered her options. A creative life of self- discovery emerged on top of the list.

Throughout her artistic career, this renowned Tasmanian artist has journeyed a personal and creative path exploring historical stories and their connection to memory, place and our perception of the past. Her maternal Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage is a strong influence on her work and the desire to unearth the stories of her people runs deep.

“My major motivation to make art is aligned to my ongoing curiosity and concern about Australian history, particularly the colonial period and cross-cultural contact and interactions in the 19th century,” Gough explains. “I am trying to unravel what happened here and reconstruct what was often not well recorded or was even purposely erased or silenced by the colonising majority in terms of Aboriginal history.”

Encompassing sculpture, installation, sound and video, Gough’s practice is interwoven with tradition and history, allowing her work to travel across time to unify the past with the present in a reimagining of unresolved narratives. “Some stories permeate beyond the written or spoken word to plague me,” the artist says. “They tend to present – almost uncannily – the means, materials and techniques by which I can represent those stories in the form of art.” Using found objects such as cuttlefish bone, tea tree and shell, Gough is able to link works such as Locus, 2008, and Fugitive History: Killymoon, Spearloar, Head Count, 2008, back to the encounters of her ancestors, connecting to the native environment and the traces of those who once lived there.

Most recently, Gough’s ability to reimagine the past has led to her inclusion in the second season of Aboriginal art series Art + Soul. Presenter and respected curator Hetti Perkins says she chose Gough for her ability to “accumulate and process information (and misinformation) and chart a course through it”. Having collected Gough’s work for the Art Gallery of New South Wales during her time as senior curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, Perkins goes on to say, “Julie has always created work with conceptual rigour. She is a natural-born artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist. She makes her work with such conviction and that is what makes her and her art so compelling. Her works have integrity and they are sublimely beautiful.”

Looking over the breadth of Gough’s work, it is clear her career has been a considered process that has evolved through meticulous research and intensive creative study. “About 80 per cent of my available art time is dedicated to researching in the archives and on the ground, outdoors, mostly in Tasmania,” she says. Through this methodical progression of research and making, Gough has developed a unique visual language, conceptually rich with signs and symbols designed to trigger memory and emotion.

In Medical Series, 1994, a collection of metal cases displayed objects such as human hair and plaster teeth, evoking an uncomfortable familiarity and recalling outdated scientific experiments used to determine identity and physical attributes as a way to suggest racial inferiority. “I think art reaches an audience differently than history books and film documentaries,” states Gough. “Artworks bypass a viewer’s regular channels of sought input. They are sensed and felt, they gain a foothold before the ‘rational’ brain directs a viewer to their own precon- ceived beliefs on how to read and respond to the world. This is history re-visioned by stealth via art.”

Gough is a traveller in every sense. Her first big break was having her work selected by Judy Annear for Perspecta in 1994 and, since then, Gough has moved through a series of residencies, scholarships and academic posts, making her way across the globe via destinations including Mauritius, New York, Paris, Liverpool and Ireland. This physical experience of travel fits well with her work and the concept of place is an integral part of Gough’s art practice.

“The point about place for me is by being at various places, I am actively reconnecting with them or learning afresh about places beyond my ancestry and cultural connections, pressing my own ability to face, recognise and move beyond the limitations of having grown up in suburbia,” she explains. “Where possible, I am mostly attempting to see and experience place in the manner of my ancestors. Sometimes it feels close and that is exhilarating.”

In Traveller, 2013, a video depicting Gough attempting to hitchhike her way across Tasmania to culturally significant locations such as the Nut (a giant volcanic plug jutting into the sea on the north-west coast), the viewer watches as she moves through the colonised landscape, screwing together her spears and awkwardly hunting a horse along the way. Often relying on video to document these journeys, Gough uses location and memory to record the precarious links between past and present. She describes this expressive and ritualistic process as “a reteaching of self, as an adult with anxieties, self-imposed constraints and misreadings to work through and excise”.

While most of Gough’s work is centred on colonial and Aboriginal history, her interest in the significance of place and memory has also extended to locales further afield. During a trip to Liverpool, Gough researched the history of Bluecoat Hospital’s school and orphanage, consequently creating HOME sweet HOME, 1999. Struck by the cold, unemotional rendering of gravestones listing the names of 122 children who died in institutions such as Bluecoat, Gough painstakingly took graphite rubbings and transferred the names onto six white mattresses. Forming each name from thousands of tiny pinheads (since many of the children were exploited for labour as pin-makers), HOME sweet HOME became a poignant act of recognition and remembrance. Similar to the fastidious construction of works reflecting her own history, Gough repeatedly uses materials significant to a place to reimagine the past and bring it back into the light.

For Gough, one of the most personally affecting works to create has been Observance, 2012. Over three camping trips to her traditional country of Tebrikunna (the north-east coast of Tasmania), Gough filmed her experience of living within the landscape, alone yet constantly interrupted by eco tourists. “I learnt a lot about life, seasons, plants and animals at that place,” she recalls. “The resonances of the past became clearer and louder with each extended stay.” Further describing the work in an artist statement, Gough goes on to say, “Observance is about trespass. It is a meditation about history, memory and ancestry set amidst the ongoing globalisation of my ancestral coastlands by anonymous groups of uninvited walkers, the descendants of the colonisers.”

Currently working towards solo shows at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in Melbourne later this year and at Hobart’s Bett Gallery for mid-2015, Gough continues to poignantly inform our perception of the past and reveal how it remains a persistent under- current of contemporary experience. Reflecting on her career Gough observes, “Each work leads to the next and they are all part of a continuum. My work is a kind of pulse, demonstrating I am still alive and responding by making art.” It is a steady pulse that beats strong and clear.

The second series of Art + Soul begins on ABC1 on Tuesday 8 July, 8.30pm, as part of NAIDOC week; it continues over three episodes until Tuesday 22 July. 

Julie Gough is exhibiting at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, from 23 October to 16 November and at Bett Gallery, Hobart, in July 2015.

– See more at: http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/julie-gough-travelling-through-history/#sthash.F31mcxJc.dpuf

Julie Gough: Travelling Through History

by Briony Downes  |  Posted 08 Jul 2014

 As an artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist, Julie Gough’s career has been dedicated to unearthing Tasmania’s Aboriginal history and her own place within it. 

Being clipped on the head by an eagle is an impressive way to birth a career in art. This is exactly what happened to Julie Gough when she was riding pillion on a motorbike down a remote highway 20 years ago. The eagle hit and Gough reconsidered her options. A creative life of self- discovery emerged on top of the list.

Throughout her artistic career, this renowned Tasmanian artist has journeyed a personal and creative path exploring historical stories and their connection to memory, place and our perception of the past. Her maternal Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage is a strong influence on her work and the desire to unearth the stories of her people runs deep.

“My major motivation to make art is aligned to my ongoing curiosity and concern about Australian history, particularly the colonial period and cross-cultural contact and interactions in the 19th century,” Gough explains. “I am trying to unravel what happened here and reconstruct what was often not well recorded or was even purposely erased or silenced by the colonising majority in terms of Aboriginal history.”

Encompassing sculpture, installation, sound and video, Gough’s practice is interwoven with tradition and history, allowing her work to travel across time to unify the past with the present in a reimagining of unresolved narratives. “Some stories permeate beyond the written or spoken word to plague me,” the artist says. “They tend to present – almost uncannily – the means, materials and techniques by which I can represent those stories in the form of art.” Using found objects such as cuttlefish bone, tea tree and shell, Gough is able to link works such as Locus, 2008, and Fugitive History: Killymoon, Spearloar, Head Count, 2008, back to the encounters of her ancestors, connecting to the native environment and the traces of those who once lived there.

Most recently, Gough’s ability to reimagine the past has led to her inclusion in the second season of Aboriginal art series Art + Soul. Presenter and respected curator Hetti Perkins says she chose Gough for her ability to “accumulate and process information (and misinformation) and chart a course through it”. Having collected Gough’s work for the Art Gallery of New South Wales during her time as senior curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art, Perkins goes on to say, “Julie has always created work with conceptual rigour. She is a natural-born artist, historian, researcher and archaeologist. She makes her work with such conviction and that is what makes her and her art so compelling. Her works have integrity and they are sublimely beautiful.”

Looking over the breadth of Gough’s work, it is clear her career has been a considered process that has evolved through meticulous research and intensive creative study. “About 80 per cent of my available art time is dedicated to researching in the archives and on the ground, outdoors, mostly in Tasmania,” she says. Through this methodical progression of research and making, Gough has developed a unique visual language, conceptually rich with signs and symbols designed to trigger memory and emotion.

In Medical Series, 1994, a collection of metal cases displayed objects such as human hair and plaster teeth, evoking an uncomfortable familiarity and recalling outdated scientific experiments used to determine identity and physical attributes as a way to suggest racial inferiority. “I think art reaches an audience differently than history books and film documentaries,” states Gough. “Artworks bypass a viewer’s regular channels of sought input. They are sensed and felt, they gain a foothold before the ‘rational’ brain directs a viewer to their own precon- ceived beliefs on how to read and respond to the world. This is history re-visioned by stealth via art.”

Gough is a traveller in every sense. Her first big break was having her work selected by Judy Annear for Perspecta in 1994 and, since then, Gough has moved through a series of residencies, scholarships and academic posts, making her way across the globe via destinations including Mauritius, New York, Paris, Liverpool and Ireland. This physical experience of travel fits well with her work and the concept of place is an integral part of Gough’s art practice.

“The point about place for me is by being at various places, I am actively reconnecting with them or learning afresh about places beyond my ancestry and cultural connections, pressing my own ability to face, recognise and move beyond the limitations of having grown up in suburbia,” she explains. “Where possible, I am mostly attempting to see and experience place in the manner of my ancestors. Sometimes it feels close and that is exhilarating.”

In Traveller, 2013, a video depicting Gough attempting to hitchhike her way across Tasmania to culturally significant locations such as the Nut (a giant volcanic plug jutting into the sea on the north-west coast), the viewer watches as she moves through the colonised landscape, screwing together her spears and awkwardly hunting a horse along the way. Often relying on video to document these journeys, Gough uses location and memory to record the precarious links between past and present. She describes this expressive and ritualistic process as “a reteaching of self, as an adult with anxieties, self-imposed constraints and misreadings to work through and excise”.

While most of Gough’s work is centred on colonial and Aboriginal history, her interest in the significance of place and memory has also extended to locales further afield. During a trip to Liverpool, Gough researched the history of Bluecoat Hospital’s school and orphanage, consequently creating HOME sweet HOME, 1999. Struck by the cold, unemotional rendering of gravestones listing the names of 122 children who died in institutions such as Bluecoat, Gough painstakingly took graphite rubbings and transferred the names onto six white mattresses. Forming each name from thousands of tiny pinheads (since many of the children were exploited for labour as pin-makers), HOME sweet HOME became a poignant act of recognition and remembrance. Similar to the fastidious construction of works reflecting her own history, Gough repeatedly uses materials significant to a place to reimagine the past and bring it back into the light.

For Gough, one of the most personally affecting works to create has been Observance, 2012. Over three camping trips to her traditional country of Tebrikunna (the north-east coast of Tasmania), Gough filmed her experience of living within the landscape, alone yet constantly interrupted by eco tourists. “I learnt a lot about life, seasons, plants and animals at that place,” she recalls. “The resonances of the past became clearer and louder with each extended stay.” Further describing the work in an artist statement, Gough goes on to say, “Observance is about trespass. It is a meditation about history, memory and ancestry set amidst the ongoing globalisation of my ancestral coastlands by anonymous groups of uninvited walkers, the descendants of the colonisers.”

Currently working towards solo shows at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi in Melbourne later this year and at Hobart’s Bett Gallery for mid-2015, Gough continues to poignantly inform our perception of the past and reveal how it remains a persistent under- current of contemporary experience. Reflecting on her career Gough observes, “Each work leads to the next and they are all part of a continuum. My work is a kind of pulse, demonstrating I am still alive and responding by making art.” It is a steady pulse that beats strong and clear.

The second series of Art + Soul begins on ABC1 on Tuesday 8 July, 8.30pm, as part of NAIDOC week; it continues over three episodes until Tuesday 22 July. 

Julie Gough is exhibiting at Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, from 23 October to 16 November and at Bett Gallery, Hobart, in July 2015.

– See more at: http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/julie-gough-travelling-through-history/#sthash.F31mcxJc.dpuf


2013

Ryan, Judith, ‘Disquiet and resistance in the art of Julie Gough’, Artlink, vol 33, #2, 2013, pp.70-74
Available on: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=374860671787343;res=IELHSS

Jackett, Amy, ‘Testing Ground’, Artlink, vol 33, #2, 2013, pp.132

Dance, Polly, 2013, ‘Time travelling exorcism’, RealTime, issue #115, June-July 2013 pg. 49. http://www.realtimearts.net/article/issue115/11155 ,  RealTime Arts – Magazine – issue 115 – Time travelling exorcism

2012

Bullock, Marita, 2012, Memory Fragments: Visualising Difference in Australian History, Intellect, Bristol, UK, ISBN: 978-1-84150-553-4, pp.131 – 166

2011

2011         

      

Stewart, Jane, 2011, RIVERS RUN – review, ARTLINK, vol 31, No. 4, p.87
http://www.artlink.com.au/articles/3697/julie-gough-rivers-run/

Murray, Phip, 2011, The NGV Story: A celebration of 150 years, National Gallery of Victoria, ISBN 9780724103393, pp.156-57

Selby, Clyde, ‘Shadows from a Colonial Past’, The Mercury, Saturday Magazine, June 25, 2011

Australian Art Review, ‘Julie Gough’, May 2011

2010

Cubillo, Franchesca and Caruana, Wally, 2010, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Collection highlights, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, p.229

Thomas, Daniel, 2010, ‘Collected Flotsam and Jetsam of Sea Culture’, The Australian, 17 August 2010. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/collected-flotsam-and-jetsam-of-sea-culture/story-e6frg8n6-1225906070341

Gibson, Ross, ‘North on Trouble Road’ in catalogue: Rivers Run, 5 February – 14 March 2010, Cairns Regional Gallery, Curator Janette Laver, ISBN978-0-646-52757-4, pp.6-11. Download catalogue: Rivers Run catalogue 2010

 Ozolins, Brigita, ‘Competing Histories’ in catalogue: Rivers Run, 5 February – 14 March, Cairns Regional Gallery, Curator Janette Laver, ISBN978-0-646-52757-4, pp.24-27

2009          

Crawford, Kate, ‘Clever application of metaphors wins art prize’, Mosman News, 20 Nov  2009. http://mosman-daily.whereilive.com.au/lifestyle/story/clever-application-of-metaphors-wins-art-prize/

Hickman, Pat, ‘Why weren’t we told? Two Tasmanian artists’, Surface Design: Creative exploration of Fiber and Fabric, Spring 2009, Sebastopol, CA, pp. 26-31
http://www.pathickman.com/images/WhyWerentWeTold.pdf

Johnson, Frances, 2009, ‘Open the Victorian Curiosity Cabinet’, The Age, 12 May 2009, Art Reviews

2008       

Tudor, Bec, 2008, ‘Not so Ephemeral’, Realtime, April 2008, p.46

McDonald, John, ‘Objects unearth lure of nature’, Sydney Morning Herald, Feb 23-24 2008, pp.16-17

Thomas, Daniel, 2008, ‘Environmentalists’ art at an ecotourism lodge’, Art Monthly Australia, pp.15-17, June. Download: Daniel Thomas review 2008 Art Monthly

Stanhope, Zara, Cumpston, Nici, Gough, Julie, 2008, ‘Writing about The Ranger’, UN Magazine, 2:1, issn: 1449-6747, 2008, pp.28-31

Allas, Tess, 2008, Julie Gough’, DAAO (Dictionary of Australian Artists online), COFA (College of Fine Arts) University of NSW. http://www.daao.org.au/main/read/7088

2007  

Nelson, Robert, 2007, ‘Art alive with the sound of Indigenous voices: Power and Beauty: Indigenous Art now, Heide’, THE AGE – Arts and Culture, 12 Dec 2007, p.19

Radok, Stephanie, 2007, ‘The Ranger’, Artlink Dec 2007, Vol 27. No. 4, p.95
http://archive-au.com/page/314901/2012-09-26/http://www.artlink.com.au/articles/3062/the-ranger/

Hoffie, Pat, 2007, ‘How to make a response to the invisible, to the absent?’ in: The Ranger catalogue, pp.14-28, SASA Gallery, UNISA, exhibition:11 Sept – 2 Oct 2007, Curator Mary Knights. ISBN   978-0-9803062-6-2

Spencer, Ric, 2007, ‘Artistic installation takes no prisoners’, The West Australian – Visual Arts, 27th August 2007, p.9

Kelly, Sean, 2007, ‘From an Island South’, Artlink, vol 27, no.2, 2007, pp.32-36

Kunda, Maria, 2007, ‘Review: An Other Place’, Circa – 120, Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Season 2007, pp. 83 – 85, http://www.recirca.com/backissues/c120/p83_85.shtml

Kesson, Anna, 2007, ‘If history is a picture puzzle how do all the pieces fit?’ Thresholds of Tolerance exhibition, curated by David Williams and Caroline Turner,ANU School of Art Gallery, Canberra, 9 May – 5 June 2007, catalogue pp.51-55, ISBN  978-0-9803673-0-0

Nicholls, Christine, 2007, ‘Response and Reconciliation’, Asian Art News, Vol. 17, No.4, July/August 2007, pp.74-80

Kirker, Anne, 2007, ‘Thresholds of Tolerances ANU School of Art Gallery 10 May – 5 June 2007’, Artlink, Vol 27, No.3, p.83

Abell, Judith, 2007, ‘Another place: Gough and McQuinn, You are going the wrong way’, Realtime, March 2007 (accessed April 2007)
http://www.realtimearts.net/feature/Ten_Days_on_the_Island/8465

2006     

Haynes, Roslynn, 2006, Tasmanian visions: landscapes in writing, art and photography, Polymath Press, Hobart, ISBN  0-9775738-0-X

Kidd, Courtney, 2006, ‘Biennale Fever’, Artnotes NSW, Art Monthly Australia, July 2006, Number 191, p. 49

Smee, Sebastian, 2006, ‘A world of difference’, Arts: The Australian, Tuesday 13 June, p.14

McDonald, John, 2006, Revelations in the dark, The Sydney Morning Herald, June 24-25, pp.16-17

2005   

Bullock, Marita, 2005, ‘Melancholy Debris: Black Humour and Colonial Memory in grids by Julie Gough’, Southerly, Vol 65, Number 1, University of Sydney, pp. 35-44

2003        

Lindsay, Frances, 2003, ‘Interview with Frances Lindsay. NGV deputy Director (Australian Art)’, Gallery, Jan/Feb 2003, p.19

Freeman-Greene, Suzy, 2003, ‘Turning a love of art into a change of heart’, Agenda – Sunday Age, 2 February 2003, p.2

Lendon, Nigel, 2003, ‘Julie Gough’, <ABSTRACTIONS>, ANU, Canberra, ISBN   0 7315 3031 4, p.4

2002         

Ryan, Judith, 2002, ‘Julie Gough’s Leeawuleena’, ABV 42 – The Annual Journal of the National Gallery of Victoria, p.66-67

Jones, Kate, 2002, ‘Drawing Power’, Herald Sun, Tues 26 November 2002, p.49

Dennis, Anthony, 2002, ‘Impressive edifice puts art into focus’, Sydney Morning Herald, October 30, 2002

The Age ‘Art Transplant’, 25 October  2002

Hill, Tania, 2002, ‘Precious skill endures’, The Mercury, Hobart, 22 Oct. 2002, p28,29

2001             

Weekend Scope 2001, ‘Les installations ludiques de Julie Gough’, Mauritius, 6-12 Fev 2002, p.73

Boodhoo, Sarita, 2001, ‘Julie Gough’, Sunday Vani, 10 Fevrier 2002, p.24

Gerval-Arouff, Jeanne, 2001, ‘Les errances initiatiques de Julie Gough’, l’Express, Mauritius, 4 Fevrier, 2002, p.7

‘Julie Gough’, 2001, Jan Vani, Mauritius, 8 February 2002, p.12

Andrew, Brook, 2001, ‘Remembering  Jesus: the child in Australian Aboriginal art’, Artlink, vol.21 #2, pp.20-21. (illust.)

Arts Tasmania Grants Handbook 2001, illustrations

Lehman, Greg, 2001, ‘Tense Past – Narratives of Gaps and Silences’, Artlink, vol.21 #2, p.88. (illust.). http://www.artlink.com.au/articles.cfm?id=2166

James, Bruce, 2001, ‘The big idyll’, Spectrum – The Sydney Morning Herald: Spectrum,12-13 May 2001, pp.12-13. (illust.)

Grant, Peter, 2001, ‘Wild Art at the World’s End’, Artlink, Vol.21 #1, p.16, p.17 (illust.)

inSITE  Museums Australia (Victoria) Newsletter, April-May 2001, Cover image (Detail of: The Whispering Sands (Ebb Tide), 1998) and brief story, p.3

2000      

Godfrey, T, 2000, ‘Liverpool Biennale’, Burlington Magazine, Vol. 142, No. 1162 (Jan. 2000), pp. 53-55

Fink, Hannah, 2000, ‘Julie Gough’,Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture, ed. Sylvia Kleinert and Margo Neale, Oxford University Press, ANU, 2000, ISBN  0195506499, pp.594-595

 ‘Australia’s Indigenous Arts’, Australia Council, NSW, 2000, ISBN  0642472300, p.34 (image/text) p.52

Snell, Ted, 2ooo, ‘Julie Gough’, Australian Painting Now, ed. Laura Murray Cree and Nevill Drury,Fine Art Press, Craftsman House, Sydney, ISBN  905703252X,  pp.132–135. (2 col. images)

O’Riordan, Maurice, 2000, The Diversity of Practice’, Artlink, Vol.20, #1, 2000, p.65

Breynard, Shane, 2000, ‘Global Virus – Latest Symptoms’, Broadsheet, Summer 99/00, Vol 28, No.4, Contemporary Art Centre of SA, p.22

University of Tasmania Research Report 1999,University of Tasmania, 2000.p.20 (2 col. Images)

1999        

Reardon, Valerie, 1999, ‘Trace – Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art’, Art Monthly UK, November 1999, #231, pp.34-35

Flowers, Paul, 1999,  Rich Creativity’, Methodist Recorder, 14 October 1999, p.13 (illust.)

O’Brien, David, 1999, ‘Whispers, Lies and Text’, DB Magazine, June 16-29, 1999

The Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art – Program’, Art Forum International, Summer 1999

Kelly, Sean, 1999, ‘Art Notes – Tasmania’, Art Monthly Australia, June 1999, p.43

Nicholls, Andrew, 1999, ‘Unfolding from the Margins’, RealTime 30, April/May 1999, pp.8-9 (illust.p.9)

Scarlett, Ken, 1999, ‘Down by the Sea’, World Sculpture News, Vol 5, #1 Winter 1999, pp.33-35 (image p.34)

Hansen,David, 1999, Artlink, v.19, n.1, March 1999, pp.18-21

 Nicholls, Andrew, 1999, ‘Arts’, Westside Observer, 19 Feb. 1999, p. (illust.)

Cavenett, Wendy, 1999, ‘Black Humour’, Black + White, #35, Feb 1999, pp.28-30 (illust.p.29)                      

1998               

Morphy,Howard, 1998, Aboriginal Art, Phaidon Press Ltd, London, 1998. ISBN  0714837520, pp.403-4 (Illust.)

Sims, Amanda, 1998, ‘Peninsula Awash with Art’, The Mercury, 5 Nov. 1998, p.6 (Illust.)

Shrub, Sandra, 1998, ‘Sculpture by the Sea’, South East Bulletin, 4 Nov. 1998, p.1,8 (Illust.)

Andersch, Joerg, 1998, ‘Interpretation of the word in their deeds’, The Saturday Mercury, Hobart, 28 Nov.1998, p.38

Fink, Hannah, 1998, ‘Bad Memory: Art, Collecting and the Mercurial  World of Julie Gough’, SIGLO  #10, Aut/Win 1998. Collection/Recollection, pp.3-8. (Illust.p.6, 7, 8)

Bolton, Ken, 1998, ‘All this and heaven too – Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, 1998’, Art Monthly Australia, # 109, March 1998, pp.8-9 (Illust.p.9)

Mosby, Tom Byra Mixie, 1998, ‘The Hell of Primitivism’, Like – Art Magazine, #5, Summer/Autumn 1998, pp.18-22 (Ilust. p.21)

Murray, Kevin, 1998, ‘Adelaide Biennial’, ArtLink, v.18n.2,pp.85-86

French, Blair, 1998, ‘Adelaide Biennial’, Art + Text, # 62, Aug – Oct 1998, pp.95-96

Klaosen, Di, 1998, ‘Tasmania – A Laissez Faire Attitude’, Periphery, #34, Autumn 1998, p.17

Radok, Stephanie, 1998, ‘Black Humour’, ArtLink, v.18n.3, p.80

Quail, Avril, 1998, ‘Black Humour’, Periphery, #34, Autumn 1998, p.33

1997               

Julie Gough’  TAS APAC (Tasmanian Aboriginal Perspectives across the Curriculum), Tasmanian Aboriginal Education Unit, Hobart, p.4.54 – 4.55 (Illust.p.54-55)

Denholm, Michael, 197, ‘The Artist as Detective’, Periphery, #33, Summer 1997, pp.23-25 (Illust. 23- 25)

Warhurst, Myfanwy, 1997, ‘Revealing the Rot in Romance’, The Age, Fri. 15 Aug. 1997, Entertainment Guide, p.17 (Illust.)

Lewis, Felicity, 1997, ‘A Case of Junk Art’, The Herald/Sun, 7 Aug.1997, p.51 (Illust.).

‘Indigenous Cultures in an Interconnected World’ 1997 Fulbright Symposium – Pre-circulated papers (Coverpage Illust.)

 Barron, Sonia, 1997, ‘Provocative and Timely Humour’, The Canberra Times, 18 July 1997,p.12                            

Proudfoot, Cassie, 1997, ‘Aboriginal Artists See Funny Side’, The Canberra Times, 11 July 1997, p.11 (Illust.)

Samstag Application visuals, Art Monthly Australia, # 97, March 1997, p.9

Hill, Peter, 1997, ‘Samstag award helps artist in PhD bid’, Unitas # 115, 10 Mar. 1997, p.5

Mundine, Djon, 1997, ‘Nothing is Understood. Culture Conferences – a Final Look’, Periphery  #30, February 1997, p.21, p.35

1996            

Lehman, Greg, 1996, ‘First Voice – A vehicle for Human Rights’, Siglo – journal for the Arts, Hobart, #7 Summer 96/97, pp.4 – 8 (Illust.p.5 – 8)

Schneider, Bruno F, 1996, ‘Köln Art Fair’, Kolnische Rundschau, Koln, 12 Nov.1996

Kisters, Jurgen, 1996, ‘Köln Art Fair’, Kolner Stadt-Anzeiger, Koln, 14 Nov.1996, p.41

Wallroff, Gunter, 1996, ‘Köln Art Fair’, Express-Koln, 14 Nov. 1996, p.2

Lovibond, Jane, 1996, ‘The Art of Storytelling with everyday objects’, The Mercury, Hobart,
2 Nov.1996, p.33. (Illust.)

The Australian, ‘Samstag Winners announced’,Fri. 1 Nov 1996, p.12

The Age, 1996, ‘Samstag 1996’, Fri. Nov. 1, 1996, p. B4.

The Mercury, 1996, ‘State Grant to Artist’,Hobart, 18 Sept 1996, p.9

Timms, Peter, 1996, ‘Julie Gough for Cologne’, Art Monthly Australia, #93, Sept. 1996, Artnotes: National, p.34

Murray, Dawn, 1996, ‘Wijay Na …?’, Art Monthly Australia, #92, August 1996, p.27

Lancashire, Rebecca, 1996, ‘Cologne Selection’, The Age, Wed 31 July 1996, p.B15

Hill, Peter, 1996, ‘The Next Wave, nightclubs and surrounding islands’, Art Monthly Australia #91, July 1996, p.13

Foley, Fiona, 1996, ‘Where the Salt Water meets the Fresh Water’, Periphery,  #27, May 1996,  pp.20-23

Colless, Edward, 1996, ‘Quietly Gothic’, Realtime # 12, April/May 1996, p.38

1995        

Hill, Peter, 1995, ‘The Art Fair Murders’, Art Monthly Australia, Dec 1995, p.32

Art and Australia, Exhibition Commentary, v.33 # 1, Spring 1995, p.107

Swann, Heather B., 1995,  ‘Julie Gough’, C.A.S.T Magazine (Contemporary Art Services Tasmania) Interview by Aug.1995, pp.20-24

Nelson, Robert, 1995, ‘Julie Gough, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi’, The Age, 17 May 1995. p.23

McIntyre, Jo, 1995, ‘Insight into a Culture that is Flourishing’,The Examiner, 6 May 1995, p.19

Mendelssohn, Joanna, 1995, ‘Art Interbreeds’, The Bulletin, 21 Feb 1995, p.78

Lloyd, Tim, 1995, ‘Struggling to find a foothold’, The Adelaide Advertiser, 18 Feb 1995, p.31

Rankin, Amanda, 1995, ‘Perspecta’, The Drum Media, 14 Feb 1995, p.56

McDonald, John, 1995, ‘Why Perspecta has lost its hybrid perspective’, Sydney Morning Herald, Feb 11, 1995, p.13A

James, Bruce, 1995, ‘Perspecta Exhibition a Hybrid Exploration’, The Age, 8 Feb 1995

Kavanagh, John,  1995, ‘Contamination as a moral issue’, Business Review Weekly, 6 Feb 1995,p.84

Pos, Margaretta, 1995, ‘Fearless Five in Visual Art Impact’, The Mercury, 4 Feb 1995, p.37

1994          

The Mercury, ‘Diverse Media’ 17 Dec 1994, p.37

Annear, Judy, 1994, ‘The making of Australian Perspecta 1995’, Art Monthly Australia, Nov 1994,pp.12-13

Hill, Peter, 1994,‘Visual Artists honoured with Exhibition selection’, Unitas, 21 Oct 1994

Bromfield, David, 1994, ‘Youthful energy opens eyes to exciting styles’, The West Australian, May 21, 1994,The Arts p.4

DVD      

2007               

‘Julie Gough: we walked on a carpet of stars’, 2007, 26 minutes, Creative Cowboy films, ISBN  0-9757794-4-3, www.creativecowboyfilms.com

‘Julie Gough: The Australian Art Resources pack’, 2007, 2 x dvd, 1 x cd education resource,www.creativecowboyfilms.com

Exhibition catalogues  

2011     

Innes-Brown, Vashti, Malcolm, Chris, Williams, Pauline, 2011, Evolving Identities: contemporary Indigenous Art, John Curtin Gallery 13 May – 6 July 2011, Curtin University, West Australia, ISBN 978-0-646-55433-4, pp. 14-15, 21 and http://media.murdoch.edu.au/evolving-identities

2010               

Shifting sands : Botany Bay today, curated by Ace Bourke & Anna Lawrenson, Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre, Gymea, N.S.W. ISBN: 9781921437199 (pbk.)

Littoral,9 April – 16 May, Carnegie Gallery Hobart. Curator Vivonne Thwaites, ISBN 978-0-9805524-3-0, pp.42-43

Rivers Run, 5 February – 14 March, Cairns Regional Gallery, Curator Janette Laver, ISBN978-0-646-52757-4, 32 pages.

2009             

2009 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award, 17 Sept 2009 – 7 Feb 2010, National Gallery of Victoria, issn: 1833-8097, p.12, 30, 31, 54

Recycled Library – Altered Books, curator Michael Wardell, Artspace Mackay, 4 Sept – 25 Oct and touring 2010.  ISBN: 978-0-9805345-1-1

Returning, Barn, Rosny, curator Gwen Egg, 8 May – 7 June 2009, ISBN 978-0-9594281-5-  5, p.8

Mute relics & bedevilled creatures, Counihan Gallery, Brunswick, 1 – 31 May 2009, ISBN  978-0-9805853-0-8, p.6

TRUST, Clarendon, Evandale, Tasmania, curator Noel Frankham, 16 March – 19 April 2009 ISBN 978-1-862965-498-4, p.4, 5

2008                                     

The stuff of history, Plimsoll Gallery, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 15 August –5 Sept. Curator Jonathan Holmes. ISBN 978-1-86295-463-2, pp. 15, 16, 30, 31, 44

Parallel, Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, 5 – 31 August, Curator Brigita Ozolins, ISBN  978-0-646-49783-9, pp. 10, 11, 24, 25, 41

Ephemeral Art at the Invisible Lodge, Friendly Beaches, Freycinet Tasmania, Feb 08. Curators Dick Bett, Peter Timms, Peter Handley
http://www.freycinet.com.au/ephemeral_art/juliegough.html

2007           

Power and Beauty: Indigenous Art Now, Heide Museum of Modern Art,
17 Nov 2007 – 10 March 2008, Victoria, Australia, Curator Judith Ryan,
ISBN  978 1 921330 03 2, pp. 2, 4, 23-24

The Ranger, SASA Gallery, UNISA, 11 Sept – 2 Oct 2007, Curator Mary Knights. ISBN   978-0-9803062-6-2

An Other Place, Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, curator Sean Kelly, pp.16-19, ISBN   978-0-646-47434-2

Thresholds of Tolerance exhibition,2007, Kesson, Anna, ‘If history is a picture puzzle how do all the pieces fit?’ curators David Williams and Caroline Turner,ANU School of Art Gallery, Canberra, 9 May – 5 June, catalogue pp.51-55, ISBN   978-0-9803673-0-0. Catalogue pdf download: http://www.anu.edu.au/hrc/research/ThresholdsofTolerance/Thres_Tol_cat.pdf

2006   

Biennale of Sydney 2006, ‘Unsettledness – Julie Gough’s LOCUS’, Judith Ryan, ISBN   0 9580 403 1 1, editor/curator Charles Merewether, 7 June – 27 August, pp.120-1

Tidal 06, 1 Dec 2006 – 28 Jan 2007, Devonport Regional Gallery, ISBN   0-9775913-2-8, pp.12-13

In the world: Head, Heart, Hand, the 17th Tamworth Regional Textile Biennial 2006, Thwaites, V, ISBN -13:978 0 9577871 7 9 & ISBN -10: 9577871 7 0, p.7, 19

An island South, An Asialink/Devonport Regional Gallery Touring Exhibition, Stewart, Jane, ISBN  0 7430 3660 4, pp. 1-10

Senses of Place, Plimsoll Gallery, University of Tasmania, 4-26 April 2006 ISBN   1 862 95 306 6

Single Currency,Victoria College of the Arts, Melbourne, 3-25 March 2006

2005                

Cross Currents, Linden – St Kilda Centre for Contemporary Art, 28 June – 7 August Catalogue issue 1000, pp.1-2, 4, catalogue essay ‘Recovering’ by Julie Gough

On Island, Devonport Regional Gallery, Tasmania, Essay: On Island by Jane Stewart pp.10-11, 11 March – 17 April 2005, ISBN  0-9750729-3-5

Isolation/Solitude, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania, 31 March – 1 May, ISBN  0 9581745 3 9

2003               

<ABSTRACTIONS>, ANU Drill Hall, Canberra, 2 Oct – 9 Nov 2003, Nigel Lendon,‘Julie Gough’, ISBN   0 7315 3031 4, p.4

2002          

Flagship: Australian Art in the National Gallery of Victoria, 1790-2000, 2002, Ed. Isobel Crombie, National Gallery of Victoria, p.78

Indigenous Australian Art in the National Gallery of Victoria, NGV, 2002. p.20. ISBN  0 72410221 2 4

2001                   

Native Title Business, Museum and Gallery services QLD Touring exhibition, ISBN 0958529167

Home is where the heart is, Country Arts South Australia Touring Exhibition. ISBN  09595800-6-9

What’s Love got to do with it, RMIT Gallery Melbourne, August 200

Response to the Island, Salamanca Arts Centre, Tasmania, 2001.ISBN  0 646 41342 2

Between Phenomena: The Panorama and Tasmania, University of Tasmania, 2001. ISBN  0 85901 944 6.

John Glover Natives of the Ouse River Van Diemen’s Land 1838 and Driving Black Home 2000, Australian Collection Focus Series, Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2001

10 Days on the Island Festival Brochure, 2001, Tasmania. Page 36

2000                     

Biennale d’art contemporain de Noumea Catalogue, Agence de developpment de la culture Kanak, ADCK, 2000, ISBN  2-909-407-86-1, p42, 131

heart on your sleeve,Plimsoll Gallery, University of Tasmania, Hobart

1999          

TRACE – Liverpool Biennial, UK, Curated by Tony Bond, ISBN  0953676102

Luna Park and the Art of Mass Delirium, Museum of Modern Art at Heide, p.30

Exploring Culture and Community for the 21st Century, ‘Some Notes on Sport, Masculinity, Globalism and Art’, Global Arts Link, Ipswich, 1999. ISBN  0958634807.  p.75

Mapping our Countries, Djamu Gallery, Australian Museum, Sydney

1998              

Whispers, Lies and Text, CAST, Hobart  (Illust)

Sculpture by the Sea Tasmania Nov. 1998 (Illust p.16)

Telling Tales, Ivan Dougherty Gallery and Neue Galerie am Landesmuseum Joanneum, Graz, Austria. p.26, 55 (Illust.p.26)

All this and Heaven too – Adelaide Biennial catalogue, 1998  ‘My Tools Today’ by Clare Williamson, p.34, 35, 69 (Illust. p.35). ISBN  0730830586

1997        

Black Humour, CCAS, ACT, July 1997, p.21,22 (Illust p.21)

Extracts, Boomalli, Sydney, April 1997 (Illust.p.3)

1996     

Cologne Art Fair, Oct. 1996

Dark Secrets, Home Truths, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne

ACAF5(Australian Contemporary Art Fair #5), Melbourne, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi and conference speaker ‘Landscape and Memory’

1995    

Perspecta 1995, ‘The Eagle has Landed’, Peter Hill, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Feb. 1995, p.46

Nuini, University Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania, April 1995

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